How money in domestic politics affects U.S. diplomacy

On this week’s episode of “Conversations with Nicholas Kralev,” Harvard professor Joseph Nye, who coined the term “soft power,” talks about presidential leadership in the conduct of diplomacy, and how the United States can maintain its primacy in world affairs.

Once expelled, gay diplomat thrives in Foreign Service

How has life for gay diplomats changed in recent years? On this week’s episode of “Conversations with Nicholas Kralev,” meet Jan Krc, the public affairs counselor at the U.S. Embassy in Vienna who was once expelled from the Foreign Service for being gay.

Politics’ role in U.S.-Canada diplomacy

Do politicians make good diplomats? On this week’s episode of “Conversations with Nicholas Kralev,” meet the Canadian ambassador to the United States, Gary Doer, a longtime politician who was most recently premier of the province of Manitoba.

Can diplomacy be taught?

On this week’s episode of “Conversations with Nicholas Kralev,” meet the woman who is trying to change the State Department’s decades-long aversion to formal training: Ambassador Nancy McEldowney, director of the Foreign Service Institute.

U.S. calls on China to lift flight limits

On this week’s episode of “Conversations with Nicholas Kralev,” the chief U.S. aviation negotiator, Krishna Urs, talks about Open Skies agreements and other international airline accords, their impact on the flying public, and what diplomacy and travel have in common.

What soldiers can learn from diplomats in war zones

On this week’s episode of “Conversations with Nicholas Kralev,” Lt. Gen. Robert Caslen, superintendent of the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, talks about the different approaches America’s soldiers and diplomats employ in war zones, and what they have learned about each other in Iraq and Afghanistan.

VOA is ‘not a mouthpiece of the White House,’ director says

On this week’s episode of “Conversations with Nicholas Kralev,” the director of the Voice of America, David Ensor, talks about VOA as a tool of U.S. public diplomacy, the line between journalism and propaganda, and VOA as a news source for Americans.

Do U.S. sanctions help or hurt diplomacy?

On this week’s episode of “Conversations with Nicholas Kralev,” Ambassador Daniel Fried, the U.S. global sanctions coordinator, talks about sanctions as a tool of American diplomacy, where they have been effective, and what it takes to impose them and lift them.

Michelle Kwan’s transition from sports to diplomacy

On this week’s episode of “Conversations with Nicholas Kralev,” Michelle Kwan, a five-time world figure-skating champion, talks about her work as a public diplomacy envoy for the State Department, meeting with athletes and youth in foreign countries, and her new life in Washington.

The diplomatic doldrums

FPThe Republican-led House Appropriations Committee approved on July 24 an $8 billion cut for 2014 in the roughly $50 billion current international affairs budget. That same day, the House authorized a $5 billion reduction in the defense budget of over $600 billion — the latest reminder that many Republicans, and certainly some Democrats, don’t much value diplomacy or foreign aid. Why is that the case?

As it happens, I spent most of the spring interviewing congressional staffers and analyzing their bosses’ — and their own — attitudes toward diplomacy, the Foreign Service, and the State Department for a recently released study commissioned by the American Foreign Service Association. The study — based on interviews with 28 staffers, evenly divided between Democrats and Republicans, House and Senate — concluded that those attitudes have improved in the past decade, but a high level of distrust remains between Foggy Bottom and members of both parties on Capitol Hill…
 
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